Durham & Tyneside Dialect Group / Word Lists / Mid-Tees 1849

MID-TEES 1849 - DINSDALE'S GLOSSARY

This list is drawn from Frederick T. Dinsdale's A Glossary of Provincial Words used in Teesdale in the County of Durham (London, 1849). The area covered is from Middleton in Teesdale to Darlington and north of the Tees for 9 or 10 miles along this route. Dinsdale noted: "In the limited district which I have selected, though a general similarity of dialect prevails, yet to the west of Egglestone the pronunciation differs considerably, and terms are used which are not known in the lower part of Teesdale. Thus, we find easen for east, wessen for west, coad for cold, skifting for shifting, kirk for church etc." (pp.x-xi) i.e. higher up the dale, an older pronunciation was retained, less influenced by standard English.
For presentation here, it has seemed sensible to reduce the number of entries and condense or simplify the form of entries somewhat.

aback - behind
aboon - above, beyond
abreed - spread out
acrun - acorn
addle - to earn
afore - before
aforelang - ere long
agane - against, before
agee [ajee] - awry, crooked
aik - oak [cf.yak]
akward - awkward
A'l - I will
all o' bits - all inpieces
amaist - almost
amang - among
ane - one [cf.yan]
ananters - in the event of
anenst - opposite to
arfish - afraid
arran-web - spider-web
ask - newt
ass - ashes
ast - did ask
asuin - obliquely (cf. Welsh asswyn)
aton - upon
atweah - in two
aud - old
aum - elm
aup - mischievous child
Aw - I
awn - own
ax - to ask
aye - yes

babby - young child
babby-lakin - a child's toy
back-end - autumn
badly - unwell
bainer - nearer
bairn - child
band - did bind
bane - bone
bane-fire - bonfire
bang - to beat; to surpass
bar - to shut or close a door
bat - a blow
b'yat - did bite
beal - to roar, as of a child
beck - small rivulet
beestlins - cow's milk just after calving
behint - behind
balk - to belch
belt - did build
bere - to bear
betterly - fine
bid - did invite
bide - to abide, endure; to stay
biddy - a louse
bield - to build
binnd - to bind
bing - bin
bink - bench
birk - birch-tree
bit - as in 'a bit pie'
blake - yellow; bleak
blare - to poke out the tongue
blashy - wet
blast - explosion
blaw - to blow
bleaze - to blaze
bleb - drop of water; blister
blish - blister
blonk'd - disappointed
blow - blossom
boggle - goblin
boman - bogeyman
bonny - pretty
boody - pieces of pots
brak - did break
brang - did braing
brash - to refuse
brass - money
brast - did burst
brat - (child's) apron
Aw's bravely - I'm in good health
bray - to beat, bruise
breckins - fern
breet - bright
brent - steep
brig - bridge
brocken - broken
brossen - burst
bummel-kite - bramble berry
bunch - v.to kick with the foot; n. a kick
bus - to dress
byer - cowhouse

cabbish - cabbage
cack - excrement
caller - adj. cool
cam, com - came
cannily - decently, gently, neatly, dexterously
canny - decent, gentle neat etc
carlings - par-boiled and fried peas
caud - cold
chirm - cooing of a bird
chist - chest
chow - v. to chew; n. what you chew
chuckey - chicken
clag - to stick
claise - clothes
clam - did climb
clammer - to climb
clap - to stroke, pet
clart - v. to dirty; n. dirt
clarty- dirty
clash - throw or bang down
clashy - wet e.g. weather, road
claut - to claw
clavver - to climb up
clavver - clover
clea - n. claw
cleg - horsefly
click - to sntach, grab
clock - beetle
clogs - wooden-soled shoes
clout - cloth
cobby - hearty, brisk
coggly - unsteady
colley - meat (child's term)
cope - to exchange
corf - basket for moving coal
crack - to boast; n. news
cranch - hard brittle substance
crap - did creep
craw - crow
creckit - oblong stool
creel - basket for wool
crowdie - porridge
Cuddy - Cuthbert; a left-handed person
curran-berries - any kind of currant
cushie - cow (child's term)
cushat - wood-pigeon

daffle - to become senile
daggy - drizzly
daized - numb from cold
dang - did beat, surpass [see ding]
darkening - twilight
daurak - day's work
deave - to deafen
dee - to die
deed - dead
deef - deaf
deeth - death
delve - to dig [OE delvan]
dene - a hollow
dike - a hedge, fence
dill - to allay pain
ding - beat, strike
dinged - beat, surpassed
dinnot - do not
diz - does
dobby - ghost or spirit
doff - to take off
don - to put on
dook - to bathe
do-er - door
dope - carrion crow
doun - down
dow - to thrive
dowly - melancholy, lonely
dowter - daughter
drave - did drive
dree - lonely, wearisome
drite - to recite in a sing-song manner
drucken - drunk
dry - thirsty
dull - slightly deaf
dun - done

ear - kidney
ee - eye
een - eyes
efter - after
eldin - firewood
eliven -eleven
eller - alder
endways - forward
eneugh - enough
esh - ash-tree
ettle at - to try, attempt
expect - to suppose, believe

fadder - father
fain - glad
fairin' - present from a fair
fand - did find
fash - v. to trouble, disturb; n. trouble
faun - p.p. fallen
faut - fault
feals - to hide
feg - fig
femmer - weak, feeble
fend - to cope, make effort
fendy - industrious
fettle - prepare, get ready
fettle - condition, (good) state
fir-apple - fir-cone
fizz - to hiss
flay - to frighten
flang - did fling
flay-craw -scarecrow
flecker - to flutter
flee - a fly
flee - to fly
fleer - floor
flyte - to scold, quarrel with
fog - post-hay grass
foisty - musty
fond - foolish
foomart - polecat
force - waterfall
fore-end - early part
forgit - to forget
fra (frev before a vowel) - from
freet v. to fret; n. a fright
fremd - strange, queer
fridge - to rub
frosk - a frog
fund - p.p. found
fuz-ball - a fungus (the puffball)

ga, gav - gave
gainer way - nearer way
galloway - pony
gam - game
gan - to go
gane - p.p. gone
good ganner - good goer
gannin - going
garn - yarn
garth - paddock
gat - got
gate - way, path
gay - largish e.g. a gay while
gear - belongings, tools
Geordie - George
getten - p.p. got
gie - to give
gi-en - given
gill - small ravine
girn -to grin
girse - grass
gissy-pig - a pig (child's term)
git - to get
give ower wi' ye - desist!
gleg - to squint
glent - to riochet, glance off
glif - glimpse
glishy - bright (as of weather)
gore - a triangular patch
gotherly - sociable, familiar
gouldspink - goldfinch
graith - to put into working condition, toservice
grand - did grind
grave - to dig
gree - to agree
grip - a ditch, gutter
grow-day- a warm, oist day
grund - to grind
grund - theground
grune - grunt (of pig)
gr'yap - to grope
guises - fancy-dress revellers and competitors
gully - beadknife
g'yavlic - gavelock, crowbar

hack - a mattock
hag - to hew
hag-worm - large brown worm
h'yal - whole
haliday - holiday
halves - shares
h'yam - home
hanckled - entangled
hap - v. to cover warmly; n. bed-cover etc.
harrish - to harass
hardlins - hardly
hash, hask - harsh,cruel
hat - did hit
hatter, hotter - to shake
hauden - p.p. held
haver - (oat)meal
heck-berry - sloe
hede-wark- headache
hee - high
heft - knife-handle
heronsew - a heron
hev - to have
hewlet - an owl
hez - has
hing - to hang
hinmost - last
his-sell - himself
hitch- to hop
hivin - ivy
hobby - goose (child's term)
hoke - to scoop a hole
hollin - holly
holme - a low field, skirted by a river; esp. south side of Tees above Barnard Castle
honey - term of endearment - so used in the old ballad 'The world's sweetheart' (Roxburge Ballads, p.7)
hoppe - to hobble, tie legs of an animal
how-way - come on!
howther - rubbish, odds and ends
huff'd - offended
huz - us

ice-shoccle - icicle
iddication - education
intack - enclosedland
I'se - I am, I shall: 'Aw's gannin ti wark', 'Aw's gan wi ye'
intiv (before a vowel) - into
i', iv (before a vowel) - in
ivver - ever
ivvery - every
izzard - letter 'z'

jaistering - swaggering
jannock - behaviour that is all fair and straightforward
janty - smart, showy
jarbled - wettened e.g. trousers by grass
jasey - jersey; type of wool
jaup - shake any liquid
jimmers - hinges
jimmy - smart, spruce
jinny-howlet - owl
jinny-spinner - daddy-long-legs
joggle - to jostle
joggly - unsteady
jowl - lower jaw

kail-pot - large metal cooking pot
k'yam - comb
katty-keys - ash-tree seeds
keigh - key
kelk - a blow; a small psecies of hemlock
kelter - money (slang)
ken - to discern, know
kenning - knowledge
kend, kent - p.p. known
ken-speckled - of distinctive appearance
kep - to catch (a ball, etc)
kest, kast - p.p. thrown away, cast off
ket - filth, offal ,carrion
kevel - large hammer used in stone quarries
king-cough - hopping cough
kirn - v. to churn; n. a churn
kirsmas - Christmas
kirsen - to christen
kirsnin - n. a christening
kist - chest ("less frequently used than chist")
kit - a msall tub with 1 or 2 ears
kittle - tohave kittens; to tickle
kittlish - ticklish, difficult, uncertain
knackers - castanets
knap - a blow
knarl - to gnaw
knaw - to know
knawn - p.p. known
knodden-cake - a kneaded i.e. yeast-based cake
key - cows
kyte -belly

labber - to dabble in water
lace - to beat, flog
lynd - v. to load; n. a load
lyaf - loaf
lake - to play
lakes - sports, games
lang -long
lap - did leap; to wrap
larn - to learn; to teach
lass, lassie - girl
l'yat - late; v. to search [Ice. leita]
lead - to carry, move e.g. stones
leazes - gently sloping fields
leck - to leak
lee - n. a lie; v. to lie
lee-ar - liar
leemar - ripe nut
leet - n/adj. light
to leet on - to meet with
leetnin - lightning; dawn
leets - animal lungs
lennet - linnet
let wi't - make known, let on: 'ye mun nivver let wi't '
lib - to emasculate
lick - v. to beat, overcome; n. a beating
licks - punishment
lieve - willingly
ligny - knor or ball for 'spell & knor'
like - have to e.g. I's like to gan
limmers - shafts of a cart
lin - linnen
ling -common heath plant
lingy - adj. limber
lisk - active; n. the groin
lithe - to thicken e.g. with cornflour
lock - a small amount e.g of meal
lonnin - lane
look - to weed e.g. corn
lop - a flea
lope - v/n leap
lound - calm e.g. of weather
louze - to loose; to cease from work
low - flame [Ice. loge]
lownd - sheltered
lug - n. ear; v. to heave, pull

mack -to make
mad - angry
maddle - to forget, be confused
m'yad - p.p. made
maist - most
marrows - two alike, a pair
masty - mastiff
maumy - mellow
maundering - listless, idle
maw - my; v. to mow
mawk - maggot
mazed - bewildered
mebby - may be
meety - mighty
mell - v. to meddle (with); n. a wooden mallet with a long handle
mennon - minnow
menseful - proper, hospitable
messet - small dog e.g. spaniel
mich - much
mickle - much e.g. mickle off at yan - much the same
middin - dung-heap
midge - gnat
Miel - Michael
minch-pie - mince-pie
mind - to remember, take care to
mizzle - slight rain
mony - many
monifeet - centipede
morn - tomorrow
moudiwarp - mole
mow - to stack or pile up (corn in a barn)
mow - to have intercourse (for a man)
mud - v. might
mugwood - mugwort
mump - to hit in the mouth
mun - v. must
munnot - must not
murl - to crumble away
mush - anything worn to dust, crumbled
mysell - myself

na - no
nab - abrupt termination of a hilly ridge
nantle - to do something inan easy and careless manner
nare - near
naup - to strike in chastising
n'yan - none
neb - bill of a bird
neeze - sneeze
neet - night
neif, neaf - fist
Nelson's bullets - a sweetmeat in the shape of small balls
nevel - to beat with the fist
nip - to pinch
nivver - never
non, nan, anon - say again?
nobbut - only
nor - than
nowt - nothing; cattle e.g. Darlington Nowt Fair
nowther - neither
nuik - nook
nuin - noon
nut - not
Nut-crack Neet - All Hallows' Eve

offens, oftens - often
ofter -more frequently
on - of e/.g. they maka deal on him
ony - any
onyhow - at all events
ousen - oxen
outher - either
owe - to own e.g. whose owe it?
ower - over
ower-mony -too many
oxter - armpit

pan - to get toegther, agree
parlish - dangerous
thunder-pash - thunder-storn
pat - did put
panky - hard to please (of a child)
pautrick - partridge
pay - to beat (a jacket etc.)
paze - to lever up (a weight)
peenging - whining
peer - pear
peewit - lapwing
pether - pedlar
pez - peas
pint, piannet - magpie
pick - suit of diamonds at cards [French pique]
pippen - apple pip
plat, cowplat _ cowpat
pleaning - complaining
plennet - planet? : 'rain falls in plennets' (partially)
pleaf, plew - v.t o plough; n. a plough
plizzer - pleasure
plote - to pluck (a fowl)
poddish - porridge
poke - sack, bag [OE pocca, Ice. poki]
pool - to pull
posh - to agitate e.g. a fire [cf. poss]
pouther - a powder
powny - a pony
pratty - pretty
prent - n. print
pund - n. pound
punch - n/v kick

queen-cat - female cat
queer - choir; quire

race-ginger - ginger (root)
rackle - disorderly (of a person)
raff-yard - timberyard
ram - acrid or pungent (of a smell)
rape - rope
raps - news
raso - raspberry
ratten - a rat
rave - did rive, tore
raw - row
rax - to stretch oneself
reast - rust
reasty - rusty, rancid (of bacon)
rebbit - to rivet
red (up) - to tidy up (one's hair)
reed - red
reek - v/n smoke
reet -right
remlin, remlet - a remnant
reshes - rushes
riddy - ready
rig - a ridge
rind - hoar frost
ripe - to quarry stones
rist - v/n rest
rive - v/ to tear tp, rend; n. a rent
roaky - misty
roopy - hoarse (of voice)
roven - p.p. riven
rud - a soft red stone
r'yad - did ride
r'yam - to cry for persistently

sall - shall
sannot - shall not
s'yap - soap
sare - n/adj. sore
sarely - sorely
sark- shirt
saut - salt
sauve - the Sallow
scraffle - to slog away at (work etc.)
scran - provision
scufter - to do fussily
scumfish - to suffocate
seed - did see
seeing-glass - mirror
seld - did sell
sen - since
set - to accompany one a part of the distance he is going
Setterday - Saturday
sew - did dow (corn)
sew'd - did sew (a sea)
shack - to shake
shackle b'yan - wristbone
shale - to dray or scrape feet on ground esp. shaling
shap - v/n shape
shibbin-leater - shoe-lace
shill - to shell (pease); adj. shrill
shive -to slice (a loaf)
shool - shovel [cf. Dutch school]
shouther - shoulder
shun - shoes [OE scoon, pl.]
sic, syke, sic-like - such
siddel - schedule
sike - ditch, water-channel
sind - to rinse
sipe - to seap or ooze out
skelp - v/n slap with theopen hand e.g. on the back; esp. skelping
skep - small basket of straw e.g. for beehive
shrike - to screech
sladdery - dirty, muddy e.g. of road
sl'yad, slade - did slide
slape, slippy - slippery
sleah - a sloe
slee - sly
slocken - to quench
slosh, slush, sludge - mire
smallish - rather small
smally - small
smit - to infect
smittle - infection
smoor - to smother
snaw - snow
sneck - door-latch; v. to latch
snew - did snow
snod, snodden - to smooth down
soss - to lap up (e.g. milk, of a dog)
sowder - v/n solder
spak - did speak
sp'yan - to wean, to take off mother's milk
spang-how - to throw violently
spanker - n. well-grown...#
spelks - hazel pins used in thatching
spell - splinter
spink - chaffinch; a spark of fire
spreckled - speckled
sprent - p.p. sprinkled
squench - to quench
stee - a ladder
stag - a gander
stenchel - iron window bar
stime - a dim ray of light
stirk - heifer, 1-2 years old
stithe - pngent smell
stob - pointed stick
storken -to congeal
stot - an ox, 2-3 years old
stound - numbing pain caused by a blow
stour - dust
stown - p.p. stolen
strang- strong
streak - to stretch (trans.)
atrean - to strain
struke - did strike
stud - stood
sud - should
sump - apuddle
sweal - to diminish (e.g. of a candle flame)
sweer - to swear
swerd - sword

tack- to take
t'yad - toad
t'yan - p.p. taken; n. the one
tatie - potato
taum -fishing line
t'yav, tave - to walk laboriously e.g. over a ploughed field
taw - the shooting marble
teah - toe
tee - to tie
teem -to pour out
tell'd - did tell; p.p. told
temse - v. to sieve, sift; n. a sieve
teng - v/n sting
tenging-ether - lareg dragonfly
tew - to tire; to ruffle, mess up
thee - thigh
theek - v. to thatch
thir - these
thou's - thou art; thou shalt
thrang - a throng, bustle; adj. very busy
threap - to argue persistently
thropple - windpipe
thumper - n/adj. of great size
thunnder - thunder
thunder-pash - thunder-shower
thunner-stane - quartz pebble
ti - to
tied - obliged e.g. he's tied to gan
til um - to him
tin (before vowel) - to
timmer - timber; trees
toppin - crest e.g. of a bird, or a person's hair
trigged out - dressed smartly
to trig - to overeat
trou - trough
trunk - a trump, at cards
tuffit - a lapwing
tuk - did take
trunnle - to trundle
tummle - to tumble
tup - a ram
tweah - two
twilt - a quilt
twiny - fretful, uneasy
twitch-bell - an earwig

urchin - hedghog
urled - pinched with cold

varry - very

wad - would; n. lead in pencil
wad-n't -would not
waff - fetch, doppelganger
waffing - barking
wake - weak
walsh - showery
w'yam - belly
wan - did win
wand - did wind
wankle - unstable
ware-day - a weekday
wark - work; to ache
wark-folk - labourers
warse - worse
wath - a ford
watter - water
weah - sorry, unhappy
weel - well
weeny -small
weet - v/adj. wet
we'se - we shall
wesh - wash
whang - large piece or share (of anything)
whatsomivver - whatever
wheah - who
wheezle - to wheeze
whemmle - to overturn a container
whent - quaint
whick - alive e.g. which-hedge
whilk - which
whin - furze, gorse
whinge - to whine
whisht - hushed
wh'yang, whang - bootlace
wi - with [cf. win, wiv]
wia - well, yes, why!
win - to get (something) by effort
win (before vowel) - with
winnot - will not
wiv (before vowel) - with
woho!, woy! - stop (to a horse)
wrang - wrong
wraut - a wart

yabble - able
yacker - acre
yah - one [cf. yan]
yak - oak [cf.aik]
yal - ale
yallow - yellow
yan - one [cf.ane]
yance - once
yans-sell - oneself
yark - to lash, beat
yat - gate
yaud - a horse
yee's - ye shall
yerd - yard
yerth - earth
yeuk - n/v/ itch
youl - to howl (as a dog)
yule-clog - yule-log

br> whinge - to whine
whisht - hushed
wh'yang, whang - bootlace
wi - with [cf. win, wiv]
wia - well, yes, why!
win - to get (something) by effort
win (before vowel) - with
winnot - will not
wiv (before vowel) - with
woho!, woy! - stop (to a horse)
wrang - wrong
wraut - a wart

yabble - able
yacker - acre
yah - one [cf. yan]
yak - oak [cf.aik]
yal - ale
yallow - yellow
yan - one [cf.ane]
yance - once
yans-sell - oneself
yark - to lash, beat
yat - gate
yaud - a horse
yee's - ye shall
yerd - yard
yerth - earth
yeuk - n/v/ itch
youl - to howl (as a dog)
yule-clog - yule-log