Durham & Tyneside Dialect Group / Word Lists /

TANFIELD LEA - 1960

A word list prepared ca.1960 in Tanfield Lea as part of a Women's Institute local history initiative and forwarded to our group by Gerry Ash, who writes "having spent all my formative years in the village until leaving for National Service I can guarantee its accuracy!"

aad - old
aa'd - I had
aall - all
aa'll- I will
aan - own
aa's - I is or I am
aboot - about
abyun - above
accoont - account
aflaid - afraid
agyen - again
ahint - behind
airm - arm
alang - along
amang - among
ansor - answer

bool - bowl
baggor - beggar
bacaas - because
behint - behind
belang - belong
belaa - below
band - bound
biv - by, used before vowel
bord - bird, board
baall - ball, bawl
bornt - burnt
bash - to smash
begox
byen - bone
blaa - blow
blyem - blame
bowt - bought
breed - bread
broon - brown
borst - burst
byuts - boots

caad - cold
caal - call
caatiun - caution
canny
claes - clothes
clag - to stick
clarts - mud
cowp - overturn
crood - crowd
cuddy - donkey
cull - silly person

de - do, div before a vowel
deed - dead
dis - does
divvent - don't
doot - doubt
dorty - dirty
dreed - dread
drucken - drunken

een - eyes
eftornyun - afternoon
eneuf - enough
elwis - always
eftor - after

feall - fall
fund - found
fethor - father
flaid - afrald
fool - fowl
fornenst - opposite
frae - from, frev before a vowel
fyul - fool

gan - go
gaffor - foreman
gar - to compel
gav - gave
Geordy
gie - give
ghaist - ghost
glee-eyed - squint
gob - mouth
gommeral
grozer - gooseberry

had-away - get along
heed - head
hes - has
bet - hot
he' - have, hev before a vowel
hevveut - haven't
hyem - home
hing - hang
hinny
hoor - hour
horsel - herself
howk - to dig
howway - come along

isteed - instead
inte - into, óntiv before a vowel
ivvory - every
iv - in

kittle - tickle, ticklish
knaa - kaow

lang - long
laayor - lawyer
laa - low, law
lee - lie
leet - light
leeve - live
lowe - a flame
lowp - to leap
luik - look
lucksta - look thou

ma - my
mair - more
marcy - mercy
mara - mate, companion
mebbes, mevvies - perhaps
mony - many
muthor
mun - must
myed - made
myek - make
rnesel - myself
myun - moon

neet - night
nivvor - never
nobbut - only
nowt - nothing
nowther - neither
nyem - name
nyen - none

oney - only
onny - any
oot - out
ower - over
owt - ought. aught, anything

plyace - place
pollis - police
porceed - proceed
powny - pony
prent - print
prood - proud
pund - pound

quairt - quart

raa - a row of houses
reet - right

sair - sore, very much
sang - song
sartin - certain
se- so
shool - a shovel
sic - such
skelp - strike
skyul - school
slaa - slow
snaa - snow
soom - to swim
styen - stone
syun - soon
sowt - sought

taed - toad
ta'en - taken
taal - tall
te - to, tiv before a vowel
tee - too
theesel - thyself
thoo - thou
thor's - there is
thowt - thought
thraa - throw
thrang - throng, busy
tyun - tune
tormit - turnip
tumlor - tumbler
twe - two
tyek - take

varry - very

waal - wall
wad - would
waddent - wouldn't
wairsh - tasteless
wark - work
warld - world
warse - worse
weel - well
wes - was
wettor - water
whe - who
wey - why
wi' - with, wiv before a vowel
wivoot - without
wunnor - wonder
wor - our
wrang - wrong

yen - one
yence - once
yor - your
yorsel - yourself
yowl - howl

original note re blaa:
this word as a rule means to puff, to blow. It is seldom if ever used in the sense of to strike, the words shot, bat, skelp or slap being commonly employed for that purpose. 'A shot in the eye' or 'a bat on the gob (mouth)' are common expressions. 'Let's hev a blaa' means 'Let us take wind' - that is, have a rest - or 'Let us have a smoke'.