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SCOTLAND C18/2 - A SELECTION FROM BURNS' VOCABULARY

The words below are extracted from the glossary to Burns: poems and songs, edited by James Kinsley (O.U.P., 1969) and form a brief listing of words used by Rabbie Burns (died 1796) in his Scottish poems also relevant to North East dialect.

a' - all
aback - in the rear
aboon - above, over
ae - one
afore - before, in front of
again - ready for, before
agley - awry, wrong
ahint - behind
aiblens - perhaps
aik - oak
ain (adj) - own
airles - payment amde in token of employment
airt - quarter, direction
aits - oats
aix - axe
a-jee - ajar
amaist - almost
amang - among
ance - once
ane - one
ase, auss - ashes
ask - lizard
atween - between
aught - eight
aught - anything
auld - old
auldfarrant - old-fashoned...wise, witty
ava - of all, at all
ayont - beyond, past

ba' - ball
bairn - child
baith - both
ban - to curse
bane - bone
bang - to thrash
barm - yeast
bauk - cross-beam
bawk - strip of unplowed land
bear, beir - barley
beck - obeisance, curtsey
behin(t) - behind
belang - belong to
ben - indoors, parlour, contrasting with butt
bent - sandy hillock...with bent grass
beuk - book
beyont - beyond
bide - reamin, await
bield - protection, shelter, cover
birk - birch tree
bizz - to buzz
blae - blue, livid
blate - bashful
blaw - to blow
bleeze - to blaze
blether - to talk foolishly bock - to vomit
bogle - ghost, spectre, goblin
bonnie - fair, pretty...splendid, handsome
boortree - the shrub elder
brae - hill, hillside
branks - halter, bridle
brattle - clatter...noisy onset
braw, bra' - fine, splendid
brechan - horse-collar made of or lined with straw
breeks - trousers
brig - bridge
brock - badger
brose - oatmeal mixed with boiling water or milk, and salt and butter added
brunt - burnet
brust - burst
bum - to hum
burn - water, stream
busk - to prepare, dress. dress up
byke, bike - hive
byre - cowshed

ca' - call; urge forward, drive
cackit - befouled with excrement
cadger - travelling hawker
caller - fresh, cool
canny - knowing, shrewd; careful, cautious; favourable, lubky; gentle, steady, kindly, pleasant
canty (adj/adv) - lively, cheerful(ly)
carl - fellow, old man
cast - [throw]
catch'd - caught
chafft-blade - jaw-bone
cheel, chiel - lad, young fellow
chimla, chinlie - fire-place, hearth
chow - to chew
chuck, chuckie - mother hen
claes - clothers clag - an imcumbrance
clamb - climbed
clap - to stroke fondly
clash - chatter clarty - sticky, dirty
claver - clover
clavers - idle talk, chatter
cleek - to clutch, lay hold of
cleg - gad-fly
clink - cash; vb. to ring
clockin-time - hatching-time, child-bearing
cod - pillow
corbie - a raven
corn-mou - stack or pile of corn
couldna - could not
cowp, coup - to upset, capsize
crack (noun/vb) - gossip, chat craw - a crow
creel - whicker basket
crouse, croose - merry, cocksure
crowdie - oatmeal mixed with water and eaten raw; porridge
cushat - wood-pigeon

dadie - father
daffin - fooling
daft - silly, foolish
dail - dale
dail - deal, fir- or pine-wood plank
daurk - day's labour
dawd, daud - hunk, large piece
deave - to deafen
deevil, diel - devil
delver - gardener
den - dean, dingle
dight - make ready; wipe; clean
ding - to overcome, beat; dang (pret.) pushed, knocked
dinna - do not
dirl - to shake, rattle
dockin - dock (-leaf)
doubt - to fear, think, suspect, with the implication of probability
douk - to duck, dip
doup - backside, buttocks
dow - pigeon
dow - be able, dare
dowie - sad, dismal, melancholy
dozen'd - made impotent
dree - to suffer, put up with
drouk - to soak, drench
drouth - thirst; drouthy - thirsty
drucken - drunk
drumlie - sedimented, cloudy
dub - stagnant pool
duddies, duds - clothes; rags, tatters
dyke - low dry-stone wall

ee - eye; plural: een
efter - afterwards
eneuch, eneugh - enough
ettle - to purpose, aim

fain - glad, content
fairin' - a present from a fair
fash - to bother, trouble
fashious - tricky, awkward
fear'd, fear't - frightened
the feck - larger part
feg - fig
fend, fen' - shift, effort; vb: to support, fend (for themselves)
fin' - to find; pret. fand
flee - to fly
fley - to terrify, frighten
flit - to shift, move; intrans. to go, depart, change house
flyte - to scold
fulmart, fulmart - pole-cat
frae - from
frig - sexual stimulation; friggin' - rubbing

gab - to talk readily; noun: mouth
gae - to go, walk
gang - to go, depart, walk
gar - to make, cause, compel
gate - road, way
gawkie - booby, fool
gav - gave
gear - possessions, money, property
geck - toss the head in scorn
yellow geordie - guinea
gie - to give
gif - if
gimmer - yearling ewe
girdle - griddle for baking scones
girn - to grin, snarl
girt - great
gizzen - to warp; shrivel through drought
glaiket, glaikit - careless, foolish
glamor - enchantment, magic
geld - kite (bird)
gleg - quick, lively, smart
glowr - to stare wide-eyed; to gleam
gowdspink - goldfinch
gowk - cuckoo; fool, dolt
grain - branch of a tree
graith - equipment, tools, goods; dress, habit
'gree - to agree
greet - to weep, cry
grozet - gooseberry
gullie, gully - large knife

hae - have
hain - to save, spare
haivers - nonsense, gossip
hame - home
hansel - new year or good luck gift
hap - to cover, shield
harn - coarse linen, sackcloth
haud, ha'd - to hold
hauver - oat
hawkie - pet name for a cow
het - hot
heugh - crag; ravine
hinny - honey, sweetheart, darling
hing - to hang
hirple - to limp, hobble
hoggie - young sheep from time of weaning till the first fleece is sheared
houtlet - owl(et)
howdie - midwife
howk, howck - to dig, delve
hoyse - a hoist, a pull upwards
hoy't - cried 'hoy!'
hunkers - hams, haunches

i' - in, into
ilk(a) - each, every
ingle - fire burning on a hearth
I'se - I shall

jad - mare; wench
jaup - to jerk as agitated water, to splash
to jee - with a swing, sideways
jouk - to dodge, duck

kail - green kale; vegetable broth
keek - to peer, glance, peep (at)
ken - to know, be aware of, learn
kep - to keep, catch
ket - a matted, hairy fleece of wool
kirk - church
kirn - a churn
kirn - havest-home
kirs'n - to christen
kist - chest, coffer
kittle - to tickle, excite, rouse
kye - cows, cattle
kyte - belly
kyvel - to thump, bang (?) (sic)

laik, lake - a lack
lang -long
lap - enfolded, wrapped
lave - rest, remainder
lead - to lead in, cart
learn - to teach
leister - pronged spear used in salmon fishing
let - to allow
leuk - to look
libbet - castrated
licks - thrashing, punishment
lift - load, large amount
lift - sky
limmer - rascal
linn - waterfall, cascade
lintwhite - linnet
lippen - to trust, depend on
loup, lowp - to leap, jump; pret. lap
louse, lowse - to loose
lour - to glower
lowe - flame; vb. to blaze, rage
lug - ear
lum - chimney

mair, mare - geater, more; maist - mostly
mak - to make, do
'mang - among
maskin' - [brewing tea]
maukin - the hare
maun - must; maunna - must not
mickle, muckle, meikle - great, plentiful, much
mell - to consort; to meddle
mense - decorum
messan - lap-dog; cur
midden - [dung-hill]
mind - to remind, remember
minny - mother
mirk - darkness
mislear'd - unmannerly
mizl'd - confused
moudiewart, modewurk - mole
mowe - to copulate (with a woman)
mutchkin - quarter pint (Scots) c. 3/4 imperial pint #NB

na, nae - no; not
nappy - ale
neuk - corner, recess
nick - to cut
nieve - fist, clenched hand
nor - than
nowt - cattle, oxen

onie, ony - any
ought, aught - anything
oursells - ourselves
ower. owre, o'er - over
owsen - oxen, cattle
oxter'd - armed, carried under the arm

pairtrick - partridge
pauky, pawkie - cunning, craftty. sly
penny-wheep - small beer
phiz - countenance, expression of face
plack - small coin
pleugh - plow
pock - poke, bag
puddock - [toad]
pyet - magpie

quean - young girl, sturdy lass
quey - a cow from one year to two years old

ram-stam - headstrong, reckless
raw - row, file
rax - to stretch
reck - to regard, care for, heed
reek - smoke
reestet - smoke-dried, 'cured'
rice - branch
rig - arable ridge
rive - to break up
roosty - rusty
rowan - mountain ash
rowte - to bellow, roar, low

's - is, are; as; us; shall
sae - so
sair - sore(ly)
sald - sold; p.p. sell't
sall - shall
sang - song sark - shirt; chemise
saugh - willow
saut - salt
sax - six
scar - cliff, bank, rock
sconner - feel sick feel disgust; noun: disgust, revulsion
scroggy - covered with stunted bushes
see'd - saw
shanna, sha'na - shan't
shiel - hut, shanty
shog - a jog, shock
shool - shovel
shoon - shoes
sic - such; siccan - such-like siller - silver
sin, sen - since, from the time that; sinsyne - since then
skelp - to strike, beat, thrash
skyte - a smart and sudden blow
slee - clever, wise, witty, sly
sloken - to slake, satisfy
sma' - little, slight
smit - to smite
sned - to sut off, lop, prune
snell - keen, bitter
snick - latch, bar snowck - to snuff, pole about with the nose
sonsie, sonsy - good-natured, tractable' busom, comely
spail - splinter
speel - to climb
spier, speir - tp ask, inquire
spunk - a spark, match
staincher, stanchel - stanchion, iron bar
stirk - young bullock
stot - young bullock
stoure, stoor - battle, tumult, storm; adversity; dust
stow'd - filled, crammed
syke - small stream, ditch
syn(e) - then, since

tae - toe
tae - to
taed, tade - toad
take, take - to take, seize; p.p. ta'en
thairm - intestine
theek - to thatch
thir - these
thole - to endure, suffer thrang - crowd, press of people; adj. crowding, in a crowd, busy
thrapple - throat
threap - argue obstinately
thrist - thirst
thrum - an end of warp-thread left unwoven on the loom when the web is cut off
thrum - to sound monotmously, hum
till - to
timmer - timber
tittie - sister
tod - fox
toom - empty toop, tip, tup - a ram
trews, trouse - close fitting trousers, worn with stockings
trig - trim, smart
twa - two
tyke - dog, cur, mongrel

vend - to sell
wark - (noun) - work. labour
wean - child; weanies - infants
weel - well, fine, satisfied
weet - wet
we'se - we'll
wha - who
whang - thick slice of cheese; vb. to beat (as with a thong)
whatfore no - why not?
whyle, whiles - at times, sometimes
wi' - with
wifie - diminutive of wife
win - to reach, gain, get
winna - will not
won - to dwell
wordie - little word
wyte - to blame, reproach

yad - mare, old horse
year (pl.) - years
yerk - to lash, stir up yet(t) - gate yeuk - to itch
yill - ale
yird, yirth - earth
Yule - Christmas